Giveaway and Tutorial: Knitting Needle Roll

When I posted about the knitting needle roll I made as a gift a few of you expressed interest in a tutorial. Ask and you shall receive!

I had to make another needle roll for the purpose of showing you step by step instructions for this tutorial and I since I already have my own I’ve decided to give this one away.  Here’s what it looks like [*needles not included!*]:

Knitting Needle Roll

If any of you are interested in this knitting needle roll, just leave me a comment below by Friday May 10th. I’ll ship worldwide. If there is more than one person interested I will draw a name at random and will announce the winner in this space by Saturday May 11th. Fair? Okay, now on to the tutorial.

Materials

  • Outside fabric measuring 15” wide x 21” tall (we will call this “Piece A”)
  • Lining fabric measuring 15” wide x 21” tall (“Piece B”)
  • Pocket fabric measuring 15” wide x 10 ½” tall (“Piece C”)
  • Pocket fabric measuring 15” wide x 8” tall (“Piece D”)
  • Pocket fabric measuring 15” wide x 5 ½” tall (“Piece E”)
  • Fusible fleece or interfacing of choice measuring 14 ½” wide x 20 ½” tall
  • One metre of ribbon (or two pieces, 20” long each)
  • Coordinating (or contrasting) thread, scissors or rotary cutter, mat, ruler, marking tool

Please note that for this needle roll I used the same print for Pieces A and E and a coordinating solid for all other pieces. You can mix and match prints and solids, as well as thread colour, as you wish but regardless of the combination you choose I don’t think you’ll need more than a metre of fabric in total for this project.

Also, because I used quilting cotton and I wanted my roll to have some heft to it I added the fusible fleece. If you use heavier fabric, such as home decor or canvas, you may not need the fusible fleece. The choice is yours.

Construction

Step 1 – If using fusible fleece, apply it to the wrong side of Piece B following manufacturer’s instructions. Note that in order to avoid unnecessary bulk at the seams I cut my fusible fleece a ½” smaller that Piece B.

Note my interfacing is smaller than Piece B.  Fuse according to manufacturer's instructions.

Step 1 – Note my interfacing is smaller than Piece B. Fuse according to manufacturer’s instructions.

 

Step 2 – On Piece C, fold ¼ inch along the width of the piece (the 15” side), towards the wrong side of the fabric. Press. Fold under again to enclose raw edges. Press and pin. Topstitch this hem in place. Press to set stitches. This will be the top of Piece C.

Repeat this procedure with Pieces D and E.

For a different finish you may choose to enclose the top hem in contrasting bias binding like I did here. The choice is yours!

Step 2 - Fold 1/4" under, fold again to enclose raw edges, topstitch in place.

Step 2 – Fold 1/4″ under, fold again to enclose raw edges, topstitch in place.

 

Step 3 – Place hemmed Piece C on top of Piece B, right sides facing up and aligning the bottom edges.

Because there will be a 1/2″ seam allowance all around the needle roll, starting on the left edge of Piece C mark a vertical line parallel to this side edge and 1/2″ away from this edge.  The line will run from the top hem of Piece C to the bottom edge.

Next, mark parallel lines 1″ apart starting from the first edge line all the way to the other side of the piece, ending with another line 1/2″ away form the right edge of the piece.

You will have two lines 1/2″ away from each edge. Between these edge lines you will have thirteen lines 1″ apart from each other.

Step 3 - Place Piece C over Piece B; mark lines as per instructions above.

Step 3 – Place Piece C over Piece B; mark lines as per instructions above.

 

Step 4 – Pin Piece C to Piece B.  Starting on either side edge, sew along the second line from the edge (i.e. do not sew along either edge line – these will be caught as the seam allowance when we attach front to back) backtacking at the top hem to reinforce that seam.

Repeat along each one of the thirteen centre lines. Press to set stitches.

You will note that in effect you are creating the grooves/pockets into which you will insert your flat knitting needles.

You will also note that I used a walking foot, which I find were useful to keep all my layers fed smoothly.

Sew Piece C over Piece  along thirteen centre lines.  Do not sew along the lines at each edge.

Step 4 -Sew Piece C over Piece B along thirteen centre lines and through all layers. Do not sew along the lines you marked 1/2″ away from either edge.

 

Step 5 – With right sides facing up place Piece D over Piece C aligning the bottom edges.

Starting on the left edge of Piece D mark a line 2 1/2″ away from the the side edge, from the top hem of Piece D to the bottom edge.  This line will effectively be right on top of the second line you sewed from the edge of Piece C.

Next, mark parallel lines 2″ apart from this first line all the way to the other side of the piece, ending 2 1/2″ from the right edge of the piece.

You will have marked six lines in total, 2″ apart from each other.

Pin Piece D to Piece C.  Starting on either side edge, sew along the six lines you just marked on Piece D, backtacking at the top hem to reinforce. Press to set stitches.

You will note that in effect you are creating grooves/pockets a bit wider than the ones in Piece C.  These will be a good size to house your DPN’s.

Step 5 - Attach Piece D to Piece C

Step 5 – Attach Piece D to Piece C by sewing along the six lines you’ll mark per instructions above.

 

Step 6 – With right sides facing up place Piece E over Piece D aligning the bottom edges.

Starting on the left edge of Piece E mark a line 4 1/2″ away from the the side edge, from the top hem of Piece E to the bottom edge.  This line will effectively be right on top of the second line you sewed from the edge of Piece D.

Next, mark two more parallel lines 4″ apart from this first line all the way to the other side of the piece, ending 2 1/2″ from the right edge of the piece.

You will have marked three lines in total.

Pin in Piece E to Piece D.  Starting on either side, sew along the three lines you just marked on Piece E, backtacking at the top hem to reinforce that seam. Press to set stitches.

You will note that in effect you are creating grooves/pockets much wider than the ones in Pieces C and D .  These will be a good size to house your circular needles.

Step 6 - Attach Piece E to Piece D.

Step 6 – Attach Piece E to Piece D.  You can see the three lines marked to the right of each of the marking tools on the picture to the left.

 

Step 7 – Cut ribbon in half so that you end up with two pieces, each 50 cm (20″) in length. Pin the two pieces of ribbon to the left side of the roll, about 9″ from the bottom edge. You will be sandwiching the ribbon between two layers of fabric so make sure that, other than the spot you just pinned, it stays well away from the edges.

Step 7 - Pin ribbon in place and sandwich it.

Step 7 – Pin ribbon 9″ from bottom edge and well away from all other edges because it will be sandwiched by Piece A in the next step.

 

Step 8 – With right sides together, place Piece A over Pieces B, C, D and E.  Pin the two layers all around the edges. With a 1/2″ seam allowance, sew around all edges, leaving a 3″ opening at the top edge.  When you sew over the ribbon, make sure to go over it a couple of times so that it remains securely in place.

Step 8 - With right sides together, place Piece A over Pieces B, C, D, and E. Attach per above instructions.

Step 8 – With right sides together, place Piece A over Pieces B, C, D, and E. Attach per above instructions.

 

Step 9 – Clip corners.  Turn needle roll right side out.  Using a point turner poke your corners to make sure they are nice and crisp but be careful not to poke through your stitches.

Step 9 - Clip corners, turn your work and use your point turner to get some crisp corners.

Step 9 – Clip corners, turn your work and use your point turner to get crisp corners.

 

Step 10 – Fold under the opening you left at the top so that the entire top edge seam is aligned.  Press it in place and pin. You can either close this opening shut by edge-stitching with your sewing machine or by slip-stitching by hand.  I’m lazy so I decided to go the edgestitching route.

Step 10 - Edgestitch along top to close it shut.  You can also slip stitch by hand for a cleaner look.

Step 10 – Edgestitch along top to close it shut. You can also slip stitch by hand for a cleaner look.

 

Step 11 – Give the entire needle roll a good press.  Fold the top edge towards the inside, about 4″.  Press to create a crease.  Transfer your knitting needles from the mason jars/Tupperware containers/elastic bands you’ve been using as storage to your brand spanking new needle roll.  Roll it up, tie the ribbon in place and take a moment to admire your work.  While you’re at it, pat yourself in the back because you’re done.  Cool?  Cool!

Step 11 - Populate your roll and enjoy!

Step 11 – Populate your roll and enjoy!

I hope this tutorial is clear enough that you’ll be able to make your own needle roll but if you get stuck at any point, or have any questions, feel free to contact me and I will attempt to clarify.  If you make a roll of your own following this tutorial, please let me know as I would love to see a picture of it.

Happy crafting!

95 thoughts on “Giveaway and Tutorial: Knitting Needle Roll

  1. Andrea, thank you for pulling this tutorial together, I know I was an encourager!! I am saving this to make soon, as it’s something I really need and your design is perfect. Big big thank you. ( btw that means that I don’t need to be entered into your fab giveaway;-) )

  2. The tut is great! Thanks…it’s now on my to do list. I love yours…orange is a great color. Don’t draw my name… I can’t call myself a knitter till I finish at least one cowl… Other knitters should enjoy this beauty!

  3. So I found myself coming back to this post a couple times, thinking, “It’s so nice, but I don’t knit! What would I even use it for?” But I just remembered my sister knits like a fiend *and* I’ve been stuck on gift ideas, which means this is going into my sewing queue. Thanks for the tutorial!

    I should probably add that I’m not entering the giveaway since, like I said, I’m not a knitter, and others would put it to better use.

    • Meraj, if you do make one for your sister I would love to see it. And if anything in the tutorial is not clear, feel free to ask me about it.

    • Thanks, friend! If I had to do it all over again, I would get myself a set of interchangeables but by the time I discovered them I had already accumulated a ton of other needles.

  4. You are very generous, this is a great tutorial and love the one that you made and my knitting needles are everywhere, this would be perfect.

    • Keeping my fingers crossed for you on the giveaway (and for everyone else too!) I wish I had one to give away for each person that has commented.

  5. I love the fabric you used! Right now I store my knitting needles in a shoe-box, which is kinda messy. I’m very good at procrastination about sewing non-wearable things, though (I’ve been planning on sewing a purse for about 4 months…) so it would be great to win! 😀

  6. I have about a dozen or more pairs of needles, both regular, circular and dpns. , in every size and every colour. What kind of a roll would I need for all of that, or should I just still keep them in the big carton boxes? Your rolls just seem to hold only about 6 or 7 sets of needles. Thanks for your instructions , just the same. Pearl

    • This tutorial was based on a roll that holds my needles quite well. I’m sorry it won’t work for you as is. Perhaps you can still adapt it to your needs, and if not I wish you success finding what you need.

  7. Your knitting needle roll is beautiful! I love the fabric and the number of spaces for needles. Is there also space for circular needles? Wish that I saw this post so that I could have been in your giveaway. I’d try to sew it myself, but I don’t have a machine. Beautiful!

    • Thanks Caroline. I put my circulars, folded up on themselves, on the bottom pockets. That seems to work well for me. You may be able to hand stitch this bad boy. It’s small enough that it would not take that much time.

  8. This tutorial is great – a great first project for my new sewing machine, thank you! Please can you help me though (I’m being very dim). On Piece C, if it’s 16″ wide, and you leave 1/2″ on either side for seam allowance, wouldn’t there be fourteen lines between them? (1/2 + 15 + 1//2 = 16). I’m confused where the extra inch has gone! Sorry!

    • Hi Ellie, I’m glad you will give my tutorial a go and on your new sewing machine no less. You are absolutely right in being confused – the measurements listed in the tutorial are wrong! All the pieces should all be 15″ wide instead of 16″. I will edit the notes tonight when I get home form work. Thanks for pointing this out and apologies for the error.

  9. Hi Andrea, I was looking for a good tutorial for a knitting roll and I have found your is excellent for what I need. I’m at a sewing class and next week is our freestyle time and I need to want to make a wide roll for all of my needles. Having seen yours I’m now going to add the lovely little pockets too. Many thanks, RedSetter

    • Oh, you don’t need interfacing! You can use a layer of heavy fabric, like canvas or even wool felt, just something to add a bit of padding and body to the make. If you get around to making one, I would love to see a picture!

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  11. Thank you for this tute, I have adapted it to make myself a crochet hook roll, with room for a pair of scissors, my wee tin of stitch markers and a flap of felt for my wool needles. Really pleased with how it turned out. Thank you again!

  12. Thank you for the tutorial.
    I’m making one now, as a present for my friend’s birthday. I’ll send you a photo when I’ve finished it :)

  13. I made this in just a couple hours today. Your tutorial was very clear. Thank you! After making it, I realize it is not quite what I need but will use this to make the necessary adjustments. I needed something for my double pointed needles and my interchangeable (3sets!) needles. Oh well. I will probably give this one away. It turned out well and I’ll send you a photo when I get a decent one. Thanks for a great tutorial!

    • I’m glad you found the tutorial useful, Dana, even if it won’t serve your purpose. Hopefully it makes a great gift for someone else, and the starting point to create your own customized needle case.

  14. Hi just wanted to thank-you for your tutorial!

    My nan gave me my 1st sewing machine, as I wanted to give sewing a go! So as a thank-you, I’m making her the knitting needle holder as my very 1st project. :/ Hope it goes well! I’m sure it will as your tutorial seems very straightforward even to a complete beginner :)

  15. I am new to sewing having been given an old sewing machine. I have some gorgeous knit pro needles that need a home. I am going to try and give your tutorial a go when I get the machine sorted (it’s looping underneath and snapping the thread and I don’t know why). Your instructions are very detailled and I’m hoping I will be able to follow them as I have never followed a pattern before….absolute beginner lol. In the meantime I would love a chance to try and win your needle roll, I love the bird fabric and it’s very very kind of you. :-) x

    • Hi Linda, The giveaway fro the needle roll closed over a year ago – sorry! Good luck figuring out your machine. It sounds like you need to adjust the tension, but it could also be the thread you are using. Best of luck!

  16. Hi! Thank you for this tutorial. I new to sewing but I do a lot of cross stitching and knitting and have wanted to do my own cases and this easy-to-follow tutorial was just what I needed :)

    • Great! If you get to it, please send me a photo of the finished project. Also, let me know if you have any questions about the tutorial.

  17. I love this, I’m going to make one for crochet hooks as well. I will leave a comment and a link to my blog when I get to it, still organising all my materials into my new ‘girl’s shed’.

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  19. I found this tutorial on pinterest. It was perfect! Simple enough to finish in an hour (or in other words, during one nap time!). Thank you!!

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  21. Its fantastic easy for those even with little sewing ability will find this easy to do. Thanks for posting instructions its wonderful.
    AAA+++

    Cheers Chris.

  22. I came across your blog while trying to get ideas and patterns for an organizer for my knitting needles. I changed it up a bit since I have a lot of needles. It came out pretty good and I’m satisfied with it! Thanks for the post!

    I linked to a picture post on FB – hope it works

    • I’m glad you were able to use the tutorial as inspiration to create your own, Christine. Sadly I can;t see the picture – I’m not on FB and the system won;t let me see your profile unless I sign in. I’m sure it is beautiful.

  23. Thank you so much for this tutorial :) I was in desperation and had even purchased some knitting roll patterns online and NONE of them compare to yours, and you’re giving yours away….very kind of you!!!

  24. Made your needle roll, good tutorial!!
    Made half the width, I don’t have that many needles…but even so, very easy.
    Will use tutorial again to make one for my sister.

  25. Thanks so much for your generous free tutorial : ) I am a new knitter and look forward to having a pretty space to stash my needles. I am in the middle of the project and was wondering if you designed the straight needle octets for 14″ needles? Mine are only 10″ and is seems like there is going to be a lot of extra fabric above them. I was considering trimming 4″ off the top but wanted your opinion first. I am always hesitant to deviate from a pattern as my spatial skills are not the best! I plan on storing my 16 ” circular hat needles in the wider lower pockets : )

    With warm regards,

    Martha Gingerich

  26. Thankyou for your tutorial. I have wanted a storage solution for my needles after keeping them in a jumbled mess in a plastic bag! I started sewing again a year ago after purchasing my first sewing machine and was looking for a tutorial that was easy to follow. I made one for me and thought my daughter would love one. Will be posting hers off to Australia tomorrow as a surprise. Thanks for sharing I enjoyed sewing them.

  27. Thank you for the great tutorial! You are very talented in the ways of instruction writing. I’m fairly new to sewing but was able to follow your process very well.

    I see that it’s been awhile since you posted anything out here. I hope all is well.

    Jennifer

  28. I have been looking for Knitting needle roll pattern for ages, then by chance I came across your site. I obviously missed the “Giveaway” but your tutorial is GREAT….THANK YOU!

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